Happy Visits!

Does the thought of a trip to the vet leave your pup a bit anxious? Help him fight his fears with happy visits!

Our hospital tends to be at its calmest and quietest between 1-2pm daily during the week. This is a great time to pay us a social call and help build a positive, trusting relationship between your dog, our team, and our office. Your visit could be as simple as special treats and some time roaming our halls or we could help build towards a specific goal like fear free nail trims.

Some activities to try during your happy visit:

  • Extra special vet-only treats like Cheese Wiz
  • Hang out in the lobby or meander through the treatment area
  • Practice weighing in on our scale
  • Meet and greet the team 
  • Stand on an exam table or ride the lift table in the back
  • Have a tech gently work with the toes, ears, mouth, tail, or other sensitive spots
  • Get cozy in a kennel

The more positive associations your pet has with our practice, the better each subsequent visit will be for the whole family! We look forward to your visit!

Who Peed on the Rug?? Or...Feline Idiopathic Cystitis (FIC)

A complaint cat owners sometimes have is that their cat is urinating outside of the litter box. There are various medical and behavioral problems that can cause this, but we will focus on one condition in particular called feline idiopathic cystitis, or FIC for short. FIC is a sterile inflammatory disease of the bladder in cats, particularly indoor cats.

While all the causes of FIC are not entirely understood, stress is an important component. Research has shown that in susceptible cats, stress can result in inflammation of the inner lining of the bladder. Once this happens, the cells in the bladder can become further irritated by the urine and cause even more inflammation. Some cats are more prone to feeling stressed when their owners' schedules change, new people or animals are around the house, stray cats are in the yard, if there are any changes to the litter box, etc. 

Just because your cat is lounging around the house does not mean he is not stressed! Cats are good at hiding their feelings so we do not always know what they are thinking or feeling.

Signs you may see at home can include urinating out of the litter box, urinating small, frequent amounts, straining to urinate, and bloody urine. Male cats with this condition can develop a urinary obstruction, meaning that they have an obstruction in their urethra (the tube that goes from the bladder out) preventing them from being able to urinate: this is a medical emergency. Signs of FIC are often mistaken for a urinary tract infection (UTI). UTIs in young, healthy cats are actually quite uncommon (less than 1-2% incidence), so it is important to check for infection before treating with antibiotics! Bouts of FIC usually run their course in 3-7 days, so just because a cat has been treated with antibiotics and improved does not mean there was an infection present. This inflammatory disease is often a recurrent problem, which can be frustrating for owners and uncomfortable for the cats.

If you notice any of these signs in your cat, he or she should be evaluated by a veterinarian and have tests done (usually a urinalysis and urine culture) to make sure there is not an infection present. There are some medications that can be used to help decrease pain and spasming of the urethra, but ultimately the inflammation has to run its course. Crystals can sometimes be seen on the urinalysis, but unless there are bladder stones present (which would be seen on x-rays), these are considered secondary to the disease, not a primary cause, and therefore do not necessitate treatment.

There are, however, some changes that can be implemented at home to help decrease the risk of recurrence or decrease severity of signs:

  1. Water Intake: It is believed that increasing water intake can help to promote more frequent urination and prevent accumulation of debris which can trigger inflammation or cause an obstruction. This can be done by feeding wet food rather than dry, making sure there are multiple bowls of fresh water, adding tuna juice to the water to entice water consumption (although be sure to change this frequently to make sure it does not go rancid), or by getting a running water bowl.
  2. Litter Boxes: Maintaining an adequate number of clean litter boxes also serves to promote more frequent urination. There should be one litter box in excess of number of cats (for example, if you have two cats there should be three litter boxes). It is also important that the boxes are cleaned regularly. If clumping litter is used, it should be scooped every day to every other day (ideally twice daily!) and cleaned entirely every 1-2 weeks. Many cats do not like liners or covered boxes as well, so if this is present it is recommended to remove the liner and uncover the box.
  3. Environment: Environmental enrichment, especially for indoor cats, can help decrease stress. This includes making sure there are an adequate number of toys and positive interaction with people by setting aside play time every day. It is also important to have areas that the cat can call his or her own to escape to, as well as providing elevated surfaces (for example, cat towers) they can climb and sleep on. Sometimes leaving music or television on while you are gone can be helpful. Also, it can be stressful for cats inside to see another cat outside in the yard in their territory. If this is the case, blocking the window so that they stray cat cannot be seen may help decrease stress.

The “Abbey” Story

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This is the story of a stray dog adopted by monks of Mepkin Abbey written by the Director of the St. Francis Retreat Center. A client brought "Abbey's" story to our attention when she was looking for advice on flea control. We gladly donated 6 months of Frontline Plus and were compelled to share her tale...enjoy!

In the summer of 2014, a stray dog started hanging around our new retreat center at Mepkin Abbey. Although she had beautiful features, she was terribly emaciated, had obviously been abused and still had a piece of the chain she had freed herself from attached to her collar. As the director of the retreat center, I become concerned about the safety of our retreatants. We called the local animal shelter, which offered to come and get her when we caught her. They came and set a cage for that purpose.

One day Br. John came around the corner at the store, greeted by intense barking and presumed we had caught her, only to find out that we had caught a raccoon and she was barking at the raccoon. It was only months later that I learned that, from the day she appeared, she was seen as special. Those who do our laundry started dropping off food for her from day one. One of our tour docents was putting food outside the cage so she wouldn’t be tempted to go inside.

As diligently as some tried, we could not catch her. Meanwhile one group of retreatants after another started falling in love with this dog. They would sneak her food from the dining room. Then, they started taking up a collection to buy her dog food and gave her the name Abbey. She gradually and gingerly began to allow folks to get close enough to pet her. I knew then there must be plans other than the shelter for this dog. I stood back in amazement when, at the end of a three-day retreat, I heard big burly men say, “I’m going to miss Abbey.” Some women would shed tears and Abbey began to whimper herself.

To this day, Abbey gets more tips than I do. It is not uncommon to get a $50 check or home-made dog biscuits in the mail for her. She occasionally gets prayed for at worship or mentioned in the preacher’s homily. Not being a real dog lover myself, I began to realize that there was another world out there that I wasn’t a part of.

About that time someone introduced me to Dr. Linda Bender’s book, Animal Wisdom: Learning from the Spiritual Lives of Animals. There is a line in that book that reached me, one about how stray dogs and cats appear and attach themselves to those who do not want a relationship with an animal, but need one. Abbey must have intuited that because she has been my shadow ever since.

This canine presence that we tried to move on has moved in to become a significant staff presence at the retreat center. I now call her our “spiritual therapy” dog.  She gently and unobstrusively greets people when they arrive and escorts them to their rooms and is right there at their heels when they venture out for a walk. She has a way of letting everyone who comes here know that they are loved.

Dr. Bender states in her book, “Among animals, as among humans, there exist saints and bodhisattvas: individuals who have outstripped their fellows in spiritual development.” She goes on to say, “the presence of animal bodhisattvas reminds us that altruism isn’t unique to humans. All living creatures possess the capacity to feel and act out of selfless love.” We could not have ordered a dog more suited to a monastery retreat center.

As retreatants leave our monastery, we ask them to give us feedback on what has contributed the most to making their retreat experience with us beneficial. I’m no longer surprised at the number of people who mention Abbey as a key factor in the experience. I continue to be amazed at the spiritual language they use to describe the benefit. Here are some verbatim quotes taken from those feedback sheets.

“The sweet little dog named ‘Abbey’ with the spirit of a shepherd has been a joy as I watched her ‘shepherd’ individuals to and from activities.”

“Abbey is a furry-faced Guardian Angel and should be treated as a therapy dog for weary guests.”

“Even our canine retreatant showed up this week. May she learn to trust kindness and heal from that which she fled.”

“Abbey, the retreat center mascot, is absolutely an angel in a funny ‘disguise.’ She is the most intelligent and kind creature I have ever met.”

“Walking the grounds with Abbey and spending time with the trees and river put the whole experience over the top! She really is the most wonderful animal, and I have loved a lot of dogs. May she help to heal and calm and guide retreatants, brothers and friends as long as she lives!”

“Abbey has almost a mystical presence and is very egalitarian in her approach to guests.” 

“Abbey, the dog, created a truly healing time for me. This was such a gift!”

“She represents what I feel to be true about this place—all are welcome!”

A few months ago a couple of friends came to Mepkin for a retreat. As one of them was sitting in the guest dining room for supper one evening at 5:10 p.m., she realized that her friend was still over in the Luce Garden about a half mile away. She knew that if the friend didn’t get there by 5:30 she would miss supper. So, she said, “I said a little prayer that Abbey, who was lying outside the dining room door, would go get her friend.” She thought nothing more of it. Her friend did make it for supper. But after supper her friend said to her, “I would have never made if Abbey had not come and gotten me.”

What followed this story was a wonderful conversation about this woman’s experience with newborns who are so sensitive to energy because their minds are not filled with knowledge. They can be very calm and peaceful but, when they feel negative energy, they start fussing. We spoke of the similarities with animals as well. This made me wonder what further ways Abbey may help us gain insight into our own spiritual lives. For that reason I have chosen to make this the first of what I hope may be many “Abbey Stories.” I see this story as the beginning of an open book. Anyone who feels that Abbey has helped them gain spiritual insight and would like to write a poem or story about it can submit it to the editorial committee to be considered as an addition to this book.

Fr. Guerric Heckel, ocso

Director, St. Francis Retreat Center

January 24, 2015

Goodbye from Dr. Rainwater

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It is with sincere sadness that I leave Daniel Island Animal Hospital to pursue a full time career in exotic animal medicine. I am leaving one of the very best veterinary practices I have ever had the good luck to be associated with, and some of the most dedicated and wonderful clients and their pets. This was a difficult decision for me, but ultimately I decided it would be better to focus on one thing rather than always being torn between the two.

I wish everyone the best and thank you all for your support and trust over the years.

With much love,

Katie Rainwater

Curiosity Saved the Cat: Ask Missy Anything Answers!

Hi Missy,

Our cat is an only pet. She is old, frail and never leaves her home. We hate for her to have to endure the annual visit and inoculations. Are all these shots absolutely essential for her well-being?

Love your glasses,
Pussy Willow's Mom

Dear Pussy Willow's Mom,

Good question, thank you!

While vaccinations are an important part of feline wellness care, the MOST important part of each visit is the doctor's physical exam. During a routine exam, veterinarians palpate (or feel) organs, check for arthritis which is common in senior cats, and listen to the heart and lungs in addition to noting the outward appearance of skin/hair coat, eyes, ears, mouth, etc. We also recommend annual blood, urine, and fecal testing which can help us catch and treat problems that are otherwise undetectable at early onset.

Cats are great at hiding problems until they become critical and the early stages of illness are usually very subtle. In the wild, this natural behavior extends life as an apparently strong, healthy cat is less vulnerable to predators. This instinct often does not dissipate within the protective walls of your home, but your watchful eye could help identify signs of trouble early. These signs could include increased thirst and/or urination, changes in appetite, unusual wandering throughout the house, howling, hiding, or not using the litter box appropriately.

As for the vaccines themselves, we recommend indoor-only cats remain current on their core immunizations: Rabies and FVRCP (aka HCP). The Rabies vaccine is required by state law to protect pets and humans alike. FVRCP is identified by feline veterinary specialists across the nation as a core vaccine group for all cats regardless of lifestyle. While exposure to these viruses is limited for Pussy Willow, their benefits likely far outweigh the risk of vaccination. Our doctors are happy to go through the pros and cons list on an individual basis during your pet's visit to help you make an informed decision as to what's best for you and your cat.

In short, while we do want to make sure our feline patients are current on their recommended vaccinations, we also want to stress the importance of regular exams with a veterinarian. We understand trips to our hospital can be taxing on pets and owners alike - especially for our elderly kitties - and sympathize with you whole-heartedly. Our entire team has been working hard to create a more relaxed environment for cats. A cat-only exam room with diffused pheromones and low-stress handling techniques are two ways in which we are achieving this goal. Ulimately, we truly believe that regular visits - ideally every 6 months, but at least once per year - are essential for a cat's well-being.

Linked below are some more articles that might help answer your questions! Please let me know if you have any follow-up questions I can answer for you.

"Carriers and Car Rides" article link

"Wellness Exams" article link

Thanks for being a great cat mom!

Missy

P.S. I love my glasses too, thank you!

Dear Missy,

One of my kitties, Charlie, likes to wake me up every morning by licking my face and hands and also poking me and meowing at me. I realize I've created a monster by serving her breakfast as soon as I get up so I know she wants to be fed (because she guides me right to her bowl) but why does she lick so much?

Thanks,

Charlie's Mom

Dear Charlie's Mom,

Please take a moment and read this article from the ASPCA, I think you will find the answer you are looking for! In this article, you will find helpful tips on correcting this licking behavior as well.  

You will find often that I quote Jackson Galaxy, the cat behaviorist on Animal Planet. He is an amazing resource. He mentions in one of his many blogs that regulating a cat's digestion will help regulate their energy. I see you feed Charlie twice a day, canned Fancy Feast and 1/8 cup Royal Canin dry. You are already off to a great start! Why don't you try splitting up her portions into three meal times that fit your schedule? Plan the last meal about 1.5 hours before you go to bed. Before feeding, get a "Da Bird" wand (Amazon or PetCo) or something similar and interactively play with her for 10-15 minutes. Wear her out then feed her. Afterwards, she'll start to groom and head to bed with you with a full tummy and hopefully won't be as lovably obnoxious. Ideally, this should be done before breakfast too for best results.

Cats still have their ancestor's instincts even though we have domesticated them:

HUNT-->CATCH-->KILL-->EAT!

I would expect to see an improvement in this behavior within 10-14 days if you can commit. Consistency is key!

Thanks for your question! Keep me posted!

Missy

Dear Missy,

My cat was an abandoned cat in the Park Circle area and she was desperately thin and shy. Her owner had kicked her out since she is untrusting and will not be handled. After over a year living at my house she will let herself be gently petted sometimes but only with one hand, not two that could grab her unexpectedly. She has been living with me for 5 years now, but she is still not affectionate although I can corner her and get her in a crate for her annual visits to DIAH. The price I pay is that it takes about a month for her to let me touch again. So, as you can imagine, I don't crowd her. I have to let her come to me.

She will only sulk in the closet corner or under the guest bathroom sink cabinets (she is good at getting doors open) if I try to keep her indoors only. So, reluctantly, she has access to the doggy door which she uses easily. But, she mostly sits out on the back patio watching birds, chasing lizards.

She has been at DIAH several times with the crystals in the urine business. I have tried to convert her to wet food, but she just starts to not come home for days if she doesn't get her kibble which is the only thing she thinks is cat food, not cheese, yogurt, chicken pieces, etc. The big problem is that she doesn't drink enough on her own. Is there something I could put in her food that looks like kibble that would make her drink more water?

Nala's Mom

Dear Nala's Mom,

Thanks for your questions. I have some thoughts but there are situations where I feel like a home visit may be warranted. This may be one. I'll give you suggestions and we'll see.

Obviously, as you mentioned, she has trust issues. We can work with that. It will take time as there aren't usually any quick fixes.

I see you have two beagles. Just from reading some history she sounds like a big time stress kitty. Make sure she has a place in your living room where the family congregates where she can be with you all. Some place high, not just the back of a couch or top of the refrigerator. She needs to be able to have a quick escape from these high places so should she need to use a litter box, she can do so without feeling threatened.

Get a "Da Bird" wand off Amazon or at PetCo. Play with her for 10-15 minutes before meals...this will instinctively get her hunting behavior out. You may not want pups to be present during play. She needs a lot of environmental enrichment. It's awesome she gets to watch the birds and the lizards...let's get her to find something. Get a food puzzle, like the Pipolino, for cats and make sure you feed her just twice a day. She can roll it around and her food will drop out little by little.

Make sure she has 2 litter boxes in different locations. These boxes ideally need to be much larger than she is...she needs room to fully turn around inside the box. Wal-Mart and many other stores have done cats a disservice by selling the tiniest litter boxes known to man.

I am available for house calls. I would try the things described above (Da Bird wand, food puzzle, and verticle spaces) first to see if it helps with her trust.

Take care,

Missy

>^..^<

Farewell from Dr. Chappell

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Dear Daniel Island Animal Hospital family,

It is with deep mixed emotion that I announce my departure from DIAH. I am so grateful for the past 7 years I have had at this amazing hospital. Thank you for allowing me to be a part of your family and entrusting me to care for your precious pets. I will miss all of you deeply and it saddens me to have to say goodbye. The smiles and the tears we have shared together over your pets will forever be in my heart! Being a veterinarian is definitely a rewarding career but it is one that can take a toll emotionally and as much as I hate to admit, it has taken a toll. My plans for now are to take care of the emotional well being of myself and my family. I promise that in my absence, you and your pets will be in the most caring and capable hands of our awesome veterinarians and support staff! My last day at the hospital will be Saturday July 12th so please come by and say goodbye if you can!

Sincerely,

Allison Chappell, DVM

Ask the Trainer: Monday, July 14, 2014

Thinking about hiring a dog trainer? Michelle Rodriguez from Bark Busters of Charleston will be on hand Monday, July 14, for a free dog behavior assessment! Call or email our office to reserve your time.

Combating Cabin Fever

We all know the phrase "Cabin Fever," and how boredom can make us do things we may not normally do if we were otherwise pre-occupied or content. This is something our pets may feel all too well. Statistics show that boredom, or lack of enrichment, can lead to many behavior problems if not caught soon enough. Lack of mental stimulation or opportunities for our pets to satisfy their natural instincts and behaviors can cause them to act out in ways that we only understand as "bad behavior." In a perfect world, humans and domesticated animals would live together in perfect harmony while entertaining one another's instincts.

Because this world does not exist, we must find ways to satisfy our pets' needs that don't involve our dogs digging to China in our backyard or our cats knocking every single item off of every shelf in an attempt to see which one will play back with them. The idea of enrichment is to provide mental and physical stimulation for our pets to help them live more rewarding and full lives. In the long run, this will help avoid naughty behaviors that may eventually break down that bond you and your four legged child may have.

We all know that ideally dogs would love to walk miles and miles each day and sniff every single blade of grass along the way. Cats would love to chase butterflies in the sunshine for hours on end. Unfortunately, because of our busy lives, this is not always an option. This does not mean there is no hope for your dog or cat. There are many ways to help them achieve the mental stimulation they need. Many of these things can be accomplished with household items you may already have.

Tips to Combat Your Pet's Cabin Fever

Toys: A rule of thumb is that 3 toys should be provided per pet, per day. These items can be switched out and reintroduced every 5 days to help maintain novelty. Keep in mind that you should be cautious of your pet's normal chewing behavior to avoid ingesting any part of the toy. Examples for dogs are rope toys, tennis balls, squeaker toys, and Kongs. Some options for cats are toy mice, jingle balls, and feather toys.

Environmental: Animals naturally enjoy viewing their environment from different angles. This may be easier to accomplish for cats because they are more inclined to climb on counters, shelves, and basically anything in reach. If an option, it would be valuable to allow your cat to have an area, or several, that they are encouraged to climb up on. Empty shelves mounted on a wall that create a ladder effect work great but a standard cat tree is beneficial as well. An idea for dogs is to allow visual access through a window or door. Not all dogs are a good candidate for this especially if they are typically reactive to seeing other people or dogs outside. A good option for those dogs is to leave on the television or radio.

Exercise: This category is one of the most important ones. This is beneficial for overall health but can also have a major effect on naughty behavior such as separation anxiety and and other negative results of pent up energy. Routine walks for your dog are certainly beneficial but there are particular reward neurotransmitters (nerve messenger cells) that are not released unless your pet undergoes high intensity endurance running. Essentially, there are certain functions of your pet's brain that are not stimulated unless this type of exercise exists for them. If you are not typically a runner, dog parks, open fields that allow pets, and even your back yard are a great option to help them reach these needs. It wouldn't be recommended to harness your cat and take him on a 3 mile run, but they can get their daily workout with a little help from you. A cat will chase a feather string toy or laser light for hours. This is encouraged to help them burn energy but it also has a great effect on their self-confidence.

Brain Puzzles: With a little creativity, you would be surprised how many ways you can provide your pet with enrichment. Dogs and cats love new scents. Think of all the things there are to smell while they are on a walk or outside. By using a spray bottle and infusing scents like cinnamon, rosemary, lavender, or chamomile onto your pets favorite bedding or toys, you can provide them with a change to seek and explore. Toxicity potential should be evaluated before using any product. Alternating scents is the best way to keep this a fun adventure for your pet. Empty cardboard boxes with windows cut in them can provide a fun hideout for your cat to explore. Laundry baskets with or without fabric in them placed in various positions provide a new obstacle for your cat to conquer. Switching out different types of fabrics can create an opportunity for your pet to rub and roll for more tactile stimulation.

Fun with Food: Food puzzles are a wonderful opportunity for your pets to engage in their natural instinct to hunt for food. These puzzles can be purchased at most pet stores or made by using cardboard boxes and plastic containers. If you live in a single pet household, spreading his or her meal out in separate rooms gives your pet a great excuse to sniff and search to find the food. If your pet is food motivated, using food puzzles during stressful events like thunderstorms or separation can keep him or her occupied and help with counter conditioning. Using empty egg carton containers to feed your cat or small dog is an easy option. As a treat, you can fill a Kong with peanut butter or freeze a bowl of water mixed with treats or chicken broth to entertain them for a while.

The possibility for enrichment ideas are endless! As always, you must take your pet's individual needs and current health into consideration as not all of these options are suitable for every pet and household. For assistance or questions about anything in this article, don't hesitate to contact us!

Celebrating 10 Years!

Choosing Daniel Island

When the Flood family moved to Daniel Island in 1998, it was a sleepy collection of homes in the middle of nowhere.  The town existed only as a concept on paper.  To get to our home, we exited the interstate and drove miles on a winding, two-lane road, across a creek, through woods, meadows and corn fields, to reach what would become a town someday - we hoped.

A nostalgic town, with neighborhood parks, churches, schools, sidewalks, front porches, bike paths and pedestrians appealed to us as a place we might want to stay.  For several years, we watched as homes were built in park-centered neighborhoods as promised.   Our boys rode the school bus to a county school across the river, and played on recreation teams from other towns.  We drove across the river to go to church, shop or eat out.  Eventually, a bank, a general store and a gas station were opened and the Department of Transportation created an interstate exit for Daniel Island.  Our town center started to grow.  As we watched the progress, I realized the town would need a veterinarian, and I started to look into opening a hospital of my own.

Building Our Hospital

I had worked as an associate veterinarian in six different veterinary practices in four different states as my husband's army career moved us around.  All that experience contributed to my idea of an ideal animal hospital, so I sketched out a floor plan and hired an architect to turn that sketch into drawings which could be approved by the Daniel Island Architecture Review Board and the City of Charleston.  I worked with a builder to turn those drawings into reality, and a licensed veterinary technician I trusted helped me order equipment and supplies, choose a practice management software program, and develop a schedule.  For months Missy Baldwin and I worked to make our dream a reality.

In January of 2004, we opened Daniel Island Animal Hospital; not a particularly original name but I liked the idea of being an old-fashioned "town doc" and we wanted to emphasize the island town location.  We anticipated being slow at first, waiting for people to discover us, but the day we opened, and for days afterward, we had trouble getting any work done while the telephone rang constantly!

Ten years later, we have grown from a one doctor, one technician practice to a team of seventeen. We now employ five veterinarians, four licensed veterinary technicians, a practice manager, receptionists, assistants, and administrative personnel; and last year we added 1250 square feet to the original facility!  Our hospital also houses Island Dog Cuts by Teri, an independent grooming salon established in 2007.  In 2013, we founded DIAH on Wheels, a non-profit organization offering pet food and veterinary care to needy, homebound seniors in Berkeley County.

Our Passion and Promise

For ten years, Daniel Island Animal Hospital has been blessed to help this community of animal lovers care for their pets as members of the family.  Our goal is to treat each pet as if they were our own, and we strive to work with pet owners as we would our personal family and friends.  We make recommendations based upon best medicine and we continually educate ourselves to stay current.

Though veterinary medicine is how we make a living, we practice a calling in our love for pets and pet owners.  We strive to be good neighbors to our clients because we honestly like what we do and we respect the pet owners with whom we work.  I hope these priorities are communicated to you each and every time you call us on the telephone or enter our hospital.

Thanks to the support and commitment of our team, clients, vendors, and community, our hospital is celebrating 10 years of business on Daniel Island. We look forward to growing and thriving within our island town for many years to come, sharing in the joys of caring for your furry, four-legged family members.

Lynne M. Flood, DVM

Owner Veterinarian